SPANISH LEVELS

The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, Teaching and Assessment (CEFR) is a standard for measuring the level of oral and written comprehension and expression in a language.

It establishes a scale of 6 common levels of reference for the organization of languages at a global level.

The general division is grouped into 3 blocks that respond to the classic division of basic, intermediate and advanced level, with other more specific subdivisions that do not always correspond to said classic division.

This framework allows people to advance their learning in different institutions and countries in a linear way without any problem. 

For this reason, at la escuela we have designed our courses following the guidelines set by the CEFR.

WHAT CAN I UNDESTAND IN EACH LEVEL?

Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type.

Can introduce themselves and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where someone lives, people they know and things they have.

Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.

Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment).

Can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.

Can describe in simple terms aspects of their background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.

Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.

Can deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken.

Can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.

Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in their field of specialization.

Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with users of the target language quite possible without imposing strain on either party.

Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognize implicit meaning.

Can express themselves fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions.

Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes.

Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organizational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.

Can understand virtually all types of texts. Can summaries information from different oral and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation.

Can express themselves spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations.

OUR CURSES

For the A1, no knowledge of Spanish is required. From the first day of the course you begin to speak Spanish and throughout the two courses you learn to express needs, understand and use frequently used everyday expressions, as well as simple phrases intended to satisfy immediate needs.

Upon completing the level Acces A1, the student will have the ability to:

  • Understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type.
  • Introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has.
  • Interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.

FUNCTIONAL CONTENT
General information
Identify people, places and objects.
Describe people, places, objects, and states.
Compare people, objects, places, situations and actions.
Express reasons for studying Spanish.
Refer to current or habitual actions.

Opinions
Express and ask for opinions about someone or something.
Express and ask for agreement and disagreement.
Corroborate and deny other people’s information (Isn’t it true? Do you think?).

Knowledge and degree of certainty
Express knowledge and ignorance.

Feelings, desires and preferences
Express and ask for pleasure and pleasure.
Express and ask for satisfaction and desire.
Express and ask preferences.
Express and ask for desire and need.

Petitions
Order something in a public establishment.
Ask for the price of an object.

Social uses of the language
Say hello and goodbye.
Introducing someone and reacting to being.
Introduced, Congratulate and thank.

Control of oral communication
Point out that it is not understood.
Request a repetition of what was said.
Verify that what has been said has been understood.
Spell and request to be spelled.
Request that something be written.
Asking for a word or expression that is not known or has been forgotten.
Ask someone to speak more slowly or louder.

GRAMMATICAL CONTENT
Alphabet

Pronunciation
Intonation: realization of the intonation patterns (enunciative, negative and interrogative).
Accent and rhythm. Syllabic division.
Differentiation and use of upper and lower case.
Recognition and transcription of the main punctuation marks.

Nouns
Gender: rules of gender differentiation by termination. Most frequent special cases. The gender of nouns referring to people (profession, relationship, etc.).
Number: plural formation.
Agreement.

Article
Morphology. Contraction General uses of the definite and indeterminate article.
Presence and absence: general rules.
Most frequent special cases: in treatments; with temporary markers; with there / is.

Adjective
Qualifying adjective.
Gentile.
Gender and number. Agreement.
Comparatives of superiority and inferiority.

Personal pronoun
Unstressed and tonic forms.
Depending on the subject and depending on the direct object: presence, absence and placement. Sample and recognition based on direct object.

Demonstrative
Morphology and use to identify, point out and discriminate.

Possessive
Unstressed and tonic forms.
General uses: identification, property relations.
Article / possessive alternation.

Indefinite and quantitative
Morphology and use of the most frequent Apocopated forms Oppositions something / nothing.

Interrogatives
Morphology and use of the direct question Use of the most frequent interrogative particles: what / which / who …

Numerals
Formation and concordance of the most frequently used ordinals and cardinals.
Most frequent weights and measures.
Millions, just sample and recognition.

Relatives most frequently used (than).
Uses of ser y estar.
Use of ser + to identify. To be + noun.
Use of ser + adjective to refer to nationality, profession, place of origin, relationship, ideology, material.
Use of ser to express time and to refer to time.
Use of estar + adverbs of manner.
Use of being for the location of objects and people.
Contrast to be / have / carry in the descriptions There it is.

Verb tenses
Present indicative of the most frequent regular and irregular verbs. Use of the present as an imperative.
Most frequent reflexive verbs (call yourself, dedicate yourself …).
Verbs like and seem.
Introduction of the verb periphrasis of the infinitive: have to, go to, want, power, need …

Adverbs: quantity, affirmation, negation, mode, time and place.

Prepositions and prepositive phrases (to / de / para / en / con …).

Temporary references
Present indicators.
Expression of the time (only as a sample and recognition), of the days of the week, of the months, of the date, of the season of the year.

Spatial references
Indicators of spatial location.

Subject-verb and subject attribute agreement. Order of placement of sentence elements.

Impersonal use of having (In the context of the city it goes to A2).

Sentence constructions
Declarative sentences (affirmative and negative).
Direct interrogative sentences.
Coordinated sentences with the most frequently used conjunctions Comparative inferiority and superiority sentences with frequently used particles.
Adjectives with the verb in the indicative, introduced by the most frequently used relatives (that, where …).
Causal and final sentences (because, for + infinitive …).

Most used abbreviations
Addresses (Mr., Mrs., C /, nº …).
Ordinals.
Treatment formulas.

In level A2 courses you learn to describe in simple terms aspects of the past and the environment as well as issues related to immediate needs. You can establish conversations and write simple texts about aspects of daily life, travel and biographies.

Upon completion level Plataform A2, the student will have the ability to:

  • Understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment).
  • Communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.
  • Describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.

FUNCTIONAL CONTENT
General information
Refer to actions and situations of the past (Past indefinite and imperfect).

Opinions
Knowledge and degree of certainty.
Express and ask about the degree of (in) security.

Obligation, permission and possibility
Express and ask whether or not it is possible to do something.
Express and ask for the obligation to do something.
Ask, grant or deny permission.

Feelings, desires and preferences

Social uses of the language
React to information or a story with expressions of interest, surprise, joy, grief, etc.

Control of oral communication
Point out that it is not understood.
Request a repetition of what was said.
Verify that what has been said has been understood.
Request that something be written.
Asking for a word or expression that is not known or has been forgotten Asking someone to speak slower or louder.

GRAMMATICAL CONTENT
Pronunciation
Intonation Accent and rhythm.
Introduction of accentuation rules.

Nouns

Article

Qualifying adjective

Personal pronoun
Along with imperative forms In function of direct and indirect object: double pronoun.

Demonstrative

Indefinite and quantitative

Interrogatives

Numerals

Uses of ser y estar

Verb tenses
Indefinite past tense of the most frequent regular and irregular verbs Morphology and use Imperfect future.
Past perfect / indefinite based on temporal markers.
Imperfect past tense of the most frequent regular and irregular verbs.
Morphology and use.
Imperative: morphology of the most frequent uses.
Uses to invite action and to give simple instructions.
Imperative + unstressed pronouns.
Non-personal forms.
Morphology and use of the infinitive in substantive function and periphrasis Morphology and use of the participle in adjectival function and in compound tenses.

Adverbs and adverbial phrases
Quantity, affirmation, negation, mode.

Prepositions and prepositive phrases

Temporary references
Indicators of the past.
Indicators of before and after with respect to the present (before, after …).

Agreement

Sentence constructions
Exclamatory and exhortative sentences.
Uses of the most frequent interjections.
Impersonal use of power and other verbs (recipes, instructions …).
Impersonal use of oneself (you can …).
Subordinate clauses.
Nouns with the verb in indicative or infinitive (It seems to me that, I think …) Temporary adverbials, causal with the verb in the indicative and introduced by the most frequent conjunctions.
Adjectives with the indicative verb.
Conditionals: Si + present / present, future, imperative.

Upon completion level Treshold A2, the student will have the ability to:

  • Understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters
    regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.
  • Deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in area where
    the language is spoken.
  • Produce simple connected text on topics, which are familiar or of
    personal interest.
  • Describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and
    briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

FUNCTIONAL CONTENT
Talk about the past
Express habitual actions.
Describe past situations.
Express an action that occurred in a finished unit of time.
Talk about an action that happened only once.
Describe the situation or circumstances in which an event occurred.
Narrate past events; biographies.
Personal experiences.
Express a past action prior to another past action.

Express the duration of an action that started in the past and
continues in the present

Express aptitude

Define the personality

Express the cause of an event

Express probability

Express moods: joy, grief and surprise

Give information about a place
Describe Asking and giving information of a cultural nature.
Make comparisons: highlight one thing among several.

Express wishes and plans for the future
Sequence future activities.
Express a project in the future Congratulations and social wishes.

Ask and give information of a cultural nature
Describe a place
Highlight one thing among several.
Ask for the veracity of information.

Talk about personal relationships
Take an interest in someone and her life.
Express the impression that a person makes on us.

GRAMMATICAL CONTENT
Verb tenses Uses of the past past perfect, imperfect, indefinite and pluperfect indicative.
Look like someone I’m good / bad.
Probability periphrasis: – must (of) / have to + infinitive.
Verbs with preposition (rejoice at, be fed up with…).
Verbs that express change of mood (get nervous, scary, angry…).
Present subjunctive for the expression of wishes.

Uses of ser
Ser + personality adjectives (qualities and defects).

Temporary markers
Start and duration of an action (ago, since, since).
Actions that
happened only once (one day, once, that day …).
Actions that happened with a certain frequency (usually, many days, sometimes…).
Express a project in the future (within…).

Discursive connectors
When, then, after, then.
Why and how.

Prepositions
To narrate events from the past (a + specific item + amount of time + of + infintive).

Quantifiers
Too much, very, quite, rather, something, (a) little, nothing.

Exclamatory phrases
What + noun.
How much / How + verb.
Hopefully.

Sentence constructions
Comparisons: relative superlative.

Upon completing the Advanced level B2, the student will have the ability to:
  • Understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialization.
  • Interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party.
  • Produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.
FUNCTIONAL CONTENT
  • Ask, give advice and react
  • Convey what has been said by others
  • Express opinions (agree or disagree) and argue
  • Propose and react: be in favor or against
  • Describe life in a place Express advantages and disadvantages
  • Narrate events and anecdotes in the past Specify the frequency and duration of a past action. Express simultaneous actions. Express an imminent action, not performed
  • Make appointments and give the choice to the interlocutor Set conditions to do something
  • Describe and rate a show
  • Describe and comment on customs and social behaviors Express value judgments Express tastes and express surprise at customs of other cultures
GRAMMATICAL CONTENT
  • Verb tenses Review of past indicative tenses Go to + infinitive Gerund periphrasis: continue / continue + gerund Stop + infinitive Affirmative and negative imperative + enclitic pronouns. Uses of the simple conditional (I, in your place / I that you + simple conditional. Would you be so kind as to / Can you tell (him) that …) Uses of the present of the subjunctive: what + subjunctive (you want, want); (preposition) + art. determined + that + present subjunctive / Being in favor / against + noun, infinitive + that + subjunctive)
  • Uses of ser y estar Ser / estar + adjective (good, horrible …) / adverb (good / bad) Being polite / being frowned upon + infinitive) / being logical / natural
  • Temporary markers Adverbs and expressions of time While
  • Discursive connectors Argumentative: but; Nevertheless; what’s more; then
  • Sentence constructions As / when / where + present subjunctive Indirect style introduction Constructions with opinion verbs, in affirmative and negative sentences As / when / where + pres. subjunctive Relative constructions with the neuter pronoun “lo” to comment and discuss information: lo (de) que + verb; the + noun Comparisons: what more / less; superlatives. Impersonal constructions: the people; se / one + 3rd pers. Singl .; Uses of pron. you and them with generalizing value. Conditional constructions: as long as + present subjunctive … I like it / I love it / It surprises me / It catches my attention …
Upon completing the Domain level C1, the student will have the ability to:
  • Understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognize implicit meaning.
  • Express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions.
  • Use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes.
  • Produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organizational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.
FUNCTIONAL CONTENT
  • Physical and personality description.
  • Judge and evaluate.
  • Tell stories. Express temporary relationships between actions.
  • Correct erroneous information.
  • Define.
  • Give instructions.
  • Give and ask for an opinion.
  • Advise.
  • Persuade and convince.
  • Resources to express agreement and disagreement with part of what another has said.
  • Express doubt and reserve.
GRAMMATICAL CONTENT
  • Compositional elements that are associated with nouns: frequently used prefixes and suffixes. Adjectives with both genders.
  • Comparative constructions of the type more / less than, more / less than and the more / less …
  • Uses of ser y estar + qualifying adjective.
  • Vocabulary of the body and personality.
  • Morphology and uses of past indicative in Spanish.
  • Temporary markers. Organizers of the story.
  • Verbal periphrasis to mark the temporal perspective: be + gerund / participle, go to + infinitive, be about to + infinitive.
  • Morphology and uses of the present and imperfect subjunctive.
  • Morphology and uses of the conditional.
  • Uses of the subjunctive and the conditional in substantive sentences to: express opinion, advise, formulate wishes, express feelings and states of mind.
  • Uses of the indicative and the subjunctive in final, modal and temporal sentences.
  • Relative pronouns and adverbs. Morphology and frequent uses. Sentence constructions with pronouns and relative adverbs with preposition.
  • Home vocabulary. Expressions and phrases.
  • Personal pronouns.
  • Demonstrative and pronoun it with prepositional phrases.
STRATEGIC CONTENT
  • Resources to talk about learning a language.
  • Resources to control communication in class.
  • Negotiation of personal strategies and techniques for learning a language
  • Reflection and negotiation on the fact of learning a language.
  • Resources and techniques for the organization and improvement of a written text.
  • Resources to be interested in and inform about the content of a written text.
  • Resources to request actions from others: announce the performance of an action, request a favor, offer help and accept or reject it, give instructions, advise or discourage, request information in public services.
  • Resources and strategies to refer to the past: resources to organize a story, to react to a story, to relate different moments in the past, to talk about changes over time, to describe a situation in the past.
  • Positive learning strategies discovered during the course. Contact and reflection on the peninsular and Latin American variants of Spanish and its relationship with learning.
CULTURAL CONTENT
  • Daily life: work practices and leisure activities …
  • Living conditions: living standards and quality of life …
  • Personal relations: social structure, family structure and relations, relations between generations, relations of power and solidarity, relations of race and community …
  • Values, beliefs and attitudes: professional groups, regional cultures, national identity, foreign countries, states and peoples, politics, arts, wealth, income and heritage, humor …
  • Body language (CEFR: 87-88).
  • Social conventions: conventions and taboos related to behavior and conversations …
  • Ritual behavior in areas such as the following: family ceremonies and events, public and private celebrations …
 
In the Master C2 course the student is able to understand detailed information on general topics and make inferences about the opinions of the speaker, to have general conversations with an interlocutor on the phone or to understand the essential ideas of an oral presentation, speech or presentation, and distinguish them from complementary ideas. The reading of accessible literary texts, whose comprehension only requires a general knowledge of the sociocultural reality, will be followed without effort. In direct relationship with one or more interlocutors, the student will be able to participate in a conversation on general topics. They will be able to provide detailed information, express and reason their own opinions, as well as transmit their own attitude towards the topic and the development of the conversation, to make an oral presentation for a short period of time on various topics. FUNCTIONAL CONTENT
  • Express hypotheses
  • Express probability in its various degrees
  • Repeat, count and summarize what was said
  • Remind someone of something.
  • React to information showing agreement and disagreement.
  • Relate and add information pointing out oppositions and contrasts
  • Express likes, wishes and feelings.
  • Describe, express opinion and value positively and negatively.
  • Express doubt and reserve.
  • Express surprise, amazement.
  • Express complaint / protest and argue it.
  • Make suggestions, recommend
  • Ask for and give advice
  • Accept and reject advice.
  • Organization of speech. Recognize and use discourse markers to indicate reinforcing, logical sequence, and contrast relationships. Extract relevant information to make a summary. Select relevant information by contrasting or comparing ideas. Respond to outside interventions by reply. Continue other interventions through examples, arguments and formulations. Make a start. Change topic. Conclude.
  • Control of oral communication. Provide a word or expression to the interlocutor. Request information about a word or expression that has been forgotten. clarify the meaning or intent of the conversation by summarizing.
  • Express prohibition.
  • Grant permission with certain conditions.
  • Give compliments and react to a compliment.
GRAMMATICAL CONTENT
  • Morphology and uses of the present and imperfect subjunctive.
  • Correlation of times in the indirect style referring to the present, the past or the future.
  • Verbs that introduce the referred speech.
  • Transformations of the verb tenses according to the change in the communication situation.
  • Use of ser y estar.
  • Passive constructions.
  • Gerund and participle.
  • Adverbial with gerund.
  • Uses of the + adjective.
  • Subordinate clauses.
  • Nouns with verbs in the indicative, subjunctive or future.
  • Causal and concessive with verb in indicative or subjunctive, introduced by frequently used conjunctions and conjunctive phrases.
  • Discursive connectors of cause and opposition.
  • Discursive connectors, cause, opposition and information organization.
  • Subordinate clauses. Causal and consecutive with verb in indicative or subjunctive, introduced by conjunctions and frequently used conjunctive phrases.
  • Impersonality.
  • Morphology and uses of the conditional.
  • Morphology and uses of the past imperfect, the past perfect and the pluperfect of the subjunctive.
  • Conditional and concessive subordinate clauses.

Self assessment CEFR

Let us know what your level is and we will find the best option for you
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